• Motherhood,  Writing

    sleeping babies

    There was this very distinct moment in my first year of motherhood that is still so vivid in my mind. It had been a hard day–one of those days as a new mom where you feel like the quiet and hiddenness is more of a burden than a gift. It seemed like everyone else was out there doing exciting things while my own life was standing still; even the life that I had chosen and dreamed of since I was a little girl, the life that my heart always longed for. I remember saying to God, “I didn’t go to graduate school, I’m not working a high-paying job (or any…

  • Writing

    Creativity in Motherhood (+ some thoughts on social media)

    There is something so beautiful and desirable about a hidden life; a life lived for God alone and in the service of your family, behind the walls of your home and within the sacred space of those you love. I’ve been rethinking the purpose of social media and why I’m choosing to use it at all (though sparingly and with clear, intentional boundaries) after a good long break. It will never and should never show the hidden, personal life that is meant for my family alone. It won’t even show a fraction of it. When used as a tool and nothing more, it can maybe be just one of many…

  • Writing

    Marriage: Throwing a Bridge

    Original article featured on FemCatholic: http://www.femcatholic.com/marriage-throwing-a-bridge/ I’ve probably read The Jeweler’s Shop by Karol Wojtyla (the future St. John Paul II) at least a dozen times—in high school, college, and throughout my dating and engaged years. Since being married, I’ve come to see it in yet a new light, as if the characters I once thought I knew so well have suddenly come alive through their brokenness, humanity, and relatability. In the beautifully crafted play, three couples, whose lives are all somehow connected, each offer insights into the joys and trials of marriage. Ultimately, through the sacrament’s powerful bond, they are all called to love.  There is one line of the play…

  • Motherhood,  Writing

    What I Do Matters

    For as long as I can remember, I wanted to be a mother. This desire began as the simple dream of a little girl who looked to her own mother as the pinnacle of femininity, womanhood, and a life of service to her family. Years later, it became a grown woman’s fervent prayer, which I hoped and trusted God would answer in His time. When I met my husband, married him, and had our first child last spring, I felt as though a new part of me was also born; a part of me that was more protective, intuitive, nurturing, and gentle. The challenges of caring for a newborn surely…